News

Toys R Us to hire 45K workers for Black Friday

Toys R Us to hire 45K workers for Black Friday

Toys R Us plans to hire 45,000 workers nationwide. Photo: Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) — Toys R Us plans to hire 45,000 seasonal workers at its stores and distribution centers, the same number as last year, as it ramps up for the all-important holiday season.

Coming off a slower-than-expected back-to-school season, analysts and stores are bracing for a tough holiday shopping period, which accounts for as much as 40 percent of stores’ annual revenue.

Stores typically begin to hire for the holidays in mid-September and ramp up hiring in mid-October.

Overall holiday hiring is expected to be relatively flat because of cautious consumer spending and uncertainty about the economic environment. Employer consulting firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas Inc. estimates that overall seasonal hiring will not change significantly from last year’s total, when hiring rose 14 percent to 751,800 positions between Oct. 1 and Dec. 31.

Recent Headlines

in Entertainment

Stars lose millions of followers in Instagram crackdown

Fresh
kim-kardashian2

Justin Bieber and Kim Kardashian are among the celebs who lost fake followers when the social media service purged fraudulent accounts.

in Music

Styx: Rock Hall hates ‘power rock’

dennisdeyong

The "Come Sail Away" hitmakers have been overlooked again, alongside peers like Journey and Foreigner.

in Viral Videos

WATCH: Airman ‘Santa’ surprises 6-year-old son at storytime

santa

Aaron Williams was sad that his dad, stationed in South Korea, wouldn't be stateside for the holidays ... but a little Christmas magic gave him a gift he'll never forget.

in Music

Frank Sinatra app offers indepth look at singer’s life

franksinatra

The downloadable app comes as fans prepare to celebrate Ol' Blue Eyes' 100th birthday at the end of 2015.

in Entertainment

Forget politics, Sony calls ‘The Interview’ ‘desperately unfunny’

interviewmovieposter

Leaked emails show some Sony execs thought the $44 million comedy would have been a "flop."